ACVP 2024 Conference, Indianapolis, IN


Date: Jul 11, 2024 01:00 AM - Jul 13, 2024 01:00 AM

Fee

$0.00

CE Hours

10.00

CE Units

1.000

Registration closes on Aug 13, 2024 01:00 AM

Activity Type

Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

Pharmacists
Pharmacy Technicians

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

 

 

   

Minimizing stress in rodents is not only good animal welfare, but also better science. Rodents can experience stress during the post-operative period because of anxiety and fear, direct handling by humans, unrelieved pain and conventional dosing methods.   This additional stress can change physiologic function by altering metabolic rate, immune response and post-operative recovery.  Minimizing dosing stress can be a significant approach to reducing physiologic stress and hastening post-op recovery.  Understanding these low stress dosing concepts is essential when working with the biomedical research community. 

Objectives

  • Review the dosing needs of laboratory animals.
  • List available dosing strategies for laboratory animals.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Karen Froberg-Fejko

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-067-L01-P/T
Date: 07/12/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

The Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act of 1994 (AMDUCA) explains circumstances when compounding of approved animal drugs or approved human drugs is permitted but this does not include compounding of animal drugs from active pharmaceutical ingredients. FDA published GFI-256 to explain the circumstances when FDA will use discretionary enforcement when compounding animal drugs from active pharmaceutical ingredients. FDA began inspection compounding pharmacies to GFI-256 in October 2023 yet many compounding technicians and pharmacists are unaware of the requirements. The purpose of this knowledge-based activity is to review AMDUCA and GFI-256 as well as FDA actions related to animal compounding since October 2023.

Objectives

  • Explain federal requirements related to the use of bulk drug substances in veterinary compounding.
  • Describe the circumstances when FDA may use enforcement discretion related to the use of bulk drug substances in veterinary compounding.
  • Review recent FDA action related to the use of bulk drug substances in veterinary compounding.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Brenda Jensen

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-068-L07-P/T
Date: 07/12/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

This on-site lecture will review some of the pharmacological challenges unique to zoo and wildlife medicine. This includes methods of drug administration, limitations due to drug concentration and volume, issues with palatability, and the need for additional pharmacokinetic studies. It will also address the importance of extra-label drug use and compounded medications. The use of extra-label and compounded drugs are vital for veterinarians due to the lack of FDA-approved medications for the large diversity of animal species. Pharmacists are needed to provide these high quality, effective, compounded medications. However, pharmacists may be reluctant to provide these medications due to regulatory concerns and fear of adverse drug reactions or lack of efficacy. However, pharmacists can consult with veterinarians and other medical professionals to address the unique species differences in physiology and drug metabolism in order to provide safe and effective compounded medications for animal patients within the confines of the FDA's regulations as well as state and local laws.

Objectives

  • Describe common pharmacological challenges for the zoo and wildlife veterinarian.
  • Describe the benefits of compounded medications for veterinary patients.
  • Describe the potential risks of compounded medications for veterinary patients.
  • Identify regulatory resources for pharmacists interested in compounding veterinary pharmaceuticals.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Michelle Bowman

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-069-L07-P/T
Date: 07/12/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

This on-site walking tour will be a supplement to the one-hour lecture covering the same topic. It will allow the conference participants to meet a few of the unique animal species at the Indianapolis Zoo in person. During the tour, a review of the pharmacological challenges unique to each species will be discussed. This includes methods of drug administration, limitations due to drug concentration and volume, issues with palatability, and the need for additional pharmacokinetic studies. It will also reiterate the importance of extra-label drug use and compounded medications, which are vital for veterinarians due to the lack of FDA-approved medications for the large diversity of animal species in zoological settings. Pharmacists are needed to provide these high quality, effective, compounded medications.
 
To allow the conference participants to meet several of the unique species at the Indianapolis Zoo (e.g., megavertebrates, marine mammals). This will allow the audience to truly appreciate the anatomical & environmental challenges that zoo veterinarians face on a daily basis when working with these species. Pharmacological challenges specific to each species will be discussed during the tour, including the necessity for extra-label drug use and compounded medications.

Objectives

  • Describe common pharmacological challenges for the zoo veterinarian with regards to the species on the tour.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Michelle Bowman

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-078-L01-P/T
Date: 07/12/24
Time: 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

CE Hours

1.00
   

 

   

Immune-mediated diseases in dogs are managed primarily with corticosteroids used at doses which would suppress the immune system. Due to adverse effects associated with high-dose, long-term corticosteroid therapies, a number of adjunctive immune-suppressive agents are used. The indications for and considerations applied when selecting adjunctive therapies is more nuanced and complex depending on various patient and disease related factors. This lecture will present the common immunosuppressive therapies used in dogs along with their indications and contraindications. Additionally, novel immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory therapies will be discussed.

Objectives

  • List the common adjunctive immune-suppressive medications used in dogs.
  • Describe adverse effects of azathioprine, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, and leflunomide.
  • Recognize clinical scenarios which indicate the addition of an immune suppressive medication.
  • Identify emerging immune-suppressive therapies (frunevetmab, bedinvetmab, fuzapladib sodium).

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Andrew Woolcock

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-070-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Immune-mediated diseases in cats are encountered, in general, less frequently than in dogs. Because of this, and other factors, our knowledge about the use of non-steroidal immunosuppressive medications in cats is more limited. Additionally, cats have different enzyme systems and metabolic pathways compared to dogs, so the pharmacokinetics of commonly used immunosuppressive medications are quite different in cats, as are the toxicity profiles. This lecture will present the common immunosuppressive therapies used in cats along with their indications and contraindications.

Objectives

  • List the common adjunctive immune-suppressive medications used in cats.
  • Describe adverse effects of azathioprine, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, and chlorambucil.
  • Recognize clinical scenarios which indicate the addition of an immune suppressive medication.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Andrew Woolcock

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-071-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Hyperthyroidism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs. Treatment for this condition has historically been medication (methimazole); however, this medication is associated with a few side effects that can necessitate discontinuation. Thus, newer treatment options are available, such as Hill's y/d and radioactive iodine. The purpose of this knowledge-based activity is to review feline hyperthyroidism, with a focus on all treatment options, but particularly Hill's y/d and radioactive iodine therapy.

Objectives

  • Identify common clinical signs (related to hyperthyroidism).
  • Identify physical examination abnormalities related to increase in cardiac output and 'masking' of azotemia.
  • Create a treatment plan for a newly diagnosed hyperthyroid cat.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Tim Bolton

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-072-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Hypothyroidism is a relatively common endocrinopathy in dogs, with an incidence of between 0.8 and 2%. Treatment for this condition involves the daily administration of oral levothyroxine (thyroid hormone supplementation). Historically, oral tablets have been the most commonly administered of the levothyroxine formulations; however, there has been somewhat recent FDA approval of a liquid formulation. An understanding of the differences between the oral tablet and liquid formations is very important when prescribing this medication. The purpose of this knowledge-based activity is to briefly review canine hypothyroidism, with a focus on treatment options (tablets versus liquid levothyroxine).

Objectives

  • Identify common and uncommon clinical signs (related to hypothyroidism).
  • Define a treatment plan for a newly diagnosed hypothyroid dog.
  • Describe the common treatment challenges associated with hypothyroidism.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Tim Bolton

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-073-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Pharmacists are asked to fill prescriptions for SGLT2 inhibitors in cats but may not be familiar with the use in veterinary species. The purpose of this lecture is to educate pharmacists about the evidence supporting the use of these drugs in cats. The mechanism of action, indications for, and potential adverse effect of these drugs will be discussed, and recommended monitoring strategies for cats being treated with these drugs will be provided. Case studies will be used to demonstrate their application. Troubleshooting guidance will be provided during the lecture and contraindications to use discussed.

Objectives

  • Explain the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors in treatment of cats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
  • Identify specific SGLT2 inhibitors that have been adequately evaluated in veterinary species.
  • List the case characteristics of cats for which these drugs are recommended.
  • Explain the potential adverse effects SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic cats.
  • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs in diabetic cats and their contraindications.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Catherine Scott-Moncrief

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-074-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Pharmacists are asked to fill prescriptions for the use of CGM devices in dogs and cats but are not trained in their application or use in veterinary species. Pharmacists should be able to make recommendations for the application of appropriate devices and their applications in dogs and cats. The purpose of this lecture is to educate pharmacists and pharmacy technicians about the evidence supporting the use of these devices in dogs and cats. The role of these devices in monitoring diabetic dogs and cats will be discussed, and practical tips for application and maintenance of these devices will be provided. Case studies will be used to demonstrate their application. Troubleshooting guidance will be provided during the lecture and contraindications to use discussed.

Objectives

  • Explain the principles underlying the application of continuous glucose monitoring in veterinary species.
  • Identify devices that have been adequately evaluated in veterinary species.
  • List the indications for use of CGM devices in dogs and cats.
  • Explain reasons for CGM device failure.
  • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of these devices and their contraindications.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Catherine Scott-Moncrief

Activity Number

0064-9999-24-075-L01-P/T
Date: 07/13/24
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM

CE Hours

1.00